Lanvin Mens Fall 2015: A New Dystopian Reality

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For fall 2015 the Lanvin man oozes style in elegant, loosely cut trousers styled with three quarter length jackets and trench coats in contrasting colors and fabrications. The result is the conquest of individuality instead of the uniformity that comes from wearing a full suit. The pieces focused on volume and layering, whilst cultivating a uniquely individual look.

”This time we asked ourselves the question, ‘what is more important, the image or the clothes, reality or provocation’,” said Lucas Ossendrijver, the creative director of Lanvin Homme. “And that question changed the way we work and changed the way we do the show.”

The styling of the collection was divided into three disparate moods consisting of sober, sophisticated menswear that veered towards androgyny followed by an individualitistic, modern urban offering and culminating with a series of futuristic, hard structured silhouettes. The dark color palette of charcoal and dove gray along with black, chocolate brown and burgundy also added to this collection’s ability to blend into its future urban surroundings.

The first part of the show focused on the current staples in menswear, double breasted jackets, military parkas and bomber jackets in a range of neutrals colors from light gray to muted charcoal tones utilizing Prince of Wales plaids, pinstripes, and a melange of charcoal tweeds. The looks echoed the finesse of a tailored suit, albeit with a loose fit and elegant flowing trousers that emphasized a free and youthful spirit.  Among these sartorial suits was an oversized wool trench coat worn with high waisted pleated trousers trailing an ultra long scarf. 

The collection then transitioned into more of an individualistic character driven style in dark tonal grays, burgundy, tan, olive and royal blue with prints and furs to match. Shirts are worn loose with three quarter length sleeves that came down to the elbow. The half-sleeve T-shirt signaled an air of comfort and style, without looking overdone with a leather hybrid jacket thrown over the mix. A monk strap dress shoe in black was often worn, but combat boots and creepers with a touch of green, brown and white were also not out of the question. As for accessories, Lanvin proposed gloves, thick soled shoes and ultra long scarves, along with thin belts in contrasting colors to complete the elongated silhouettes.

For the finale, a tough, menacing futuristic style ensued in a mostly black color palette. These minimalist coats came paired with narrow trousers that drained into black combat boots. The hard structured silhouette further emphasized a deliberate protective edge. Some pieces came embellished with fur such as alpaca, shearling or beaver. Sturdy double faced wool and what appeared to be leather bonded with neoprene was used to faciliate a heavy metal edge to the collection. “Less of a uniform and more of an individual,” Elbaz concluded backstage. “That’s the most important thing: Not to get lost in fashion, but to get lost in translation.”

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